Revolution

In political science, a revolution (Latin: revolutio, “a turn around”) is a fundamental and relatively sudden change in political power and political organization which occurs when the population revolt against the government, typically due to perceived oppression (political, social, economic).[1] In book V of the Politics, the Ancient Greek philosopher Aristotle (384–322 BC) described two types of political revolution:

  1. Complete change from one constitution to another
  2. Modification of an existing constitution.[2]

Revolutions have occurred through human history and vary widely in terms of methods, duration and motivating ideology. Their results include major changes in culture, economy and sociopolitical institutions, usually in response to perceived overwhelming autocracy or plutocracy.

Mitsubishi Group
Subaru Corporation
Nissan Motor Company
Toyota Motor Corporation

According to the International System of Units (SI), rpm is not a unit. This is because the word revolution is a semantic annotation rather than a unit. The annotation is instead done as a subscript of the formula sign if needed. Because of the measured physical quantity, the formula sign has to be f for (rotational) frequency and ω or Ω for angular velocity. The corresponding basic SI derived unit is s−1 or Hz. When measuring angular speed, the unit radians per second is used.